Author: Brooke Lucy

As fine of a month as this past May was, June might have been even lovelier!  June delivered in a number of ways with shots of moisture, sun and some wind scattered throughout the month.  Never did a day reach 90 degrees.  Here in the semi-desert the cooler, mellow weather of “Junuary” came as a real delight.  Even though this mantra is quickly changing as we head into July, some north slopes remain greenish and streams are just now beginning to settle and clear.  Oh, and did the birds ever love June!    

I may have failed to mention the Wood-Pewee before, but these dandy little birds have made themselves well known around our yard this past month.  Although I recognize them by sight, I’d forgotten their voice – a sweet addition to all the other birdsong that flows each morning now.  Another favorite bird voice of mine is the higher pitched, more subtle Cedar Waxwing.  Both are much quieter than our chatty wrens!

One of the windier evenings I watched a pair of recently fledged Waxwings clinging tight to our apricot tree.  With the most determined of looks they hunkered as gusts tossed about a smaller limb they clung to for dear life.  Indeed.  The next moment they appeared scared to let go not knowing, perhaps, where they’d end up?  My guess is every new day comes fraught with fears for them  – for all wildlife actually.  This simply is another reminder of how fragile and resilient Nature is all at once.

True to form, June was a great month for growing.  With the moderate temperatures and full on Solstice daylight, plants seemed to take off big time.  Here at the farm our companion crop of peas and einkorn shot up and grew two feet in about a week.  Not surprisingly the einkorn out grew the peas and now when we look out at the four foot high einkorn dancing in the breeze, no blossoming peas can even be sighted !  They are down there, however, and adding nitrogen to the grain.

I did irrigate some in June, but all our supplemental water is off for the summer as the grain is full and needs to begin the curing process.  We used a total of about five inches of supplemental water, out of our water right that has a designation of 48”.  Under our more Regenerative farm system and growing less water intensive crops, we use about 75% less water than surrounding farms.  This keeps more water here in our basin, and gives more to the fish and otherwise.  More, too I suppose, for other farmers.  But less compaction for our own fields.  As I’ve mentioned before, water is a leading cause of soil compaction world-wide.  Flooding; heavy storms; supplemental irrigation – over watering is at the head of the compaction line.  Too much of a good thing?  Maybe.  Backwards “water-law”  drives this; a topic for another month.

Update on Farm Bill:  No real change as it remains mired in partisan politics.  Remember this is a $1.5 TRILLION spending package we will all be paying for.  One recent version harbors a particularly nefarious rider, as so many bills do.  This one – folded into the horticultural part of the bill approved by the House Agriculture Committee – essentially is a “get out of jail free” card for Bayer Crop Sciences and other chemical companies.  If passed, it grants Bayer legal immunity for all Roundup lawsuits – originally filed against Monsanto before the buy-out.  If passed, those that have filed suits against the chemical giant would now have to do so all over again with little if any chance of finding settlement.  The EPA sticker on the label claims Roundup is “safe.”  Therefore chemical companies would not be held liable for any health issues.  We can only hope clearer minds prevail, and this FB version will not advance.

Not to worry about any of this if you purchase organic, and organic grains from Bluebird in particular!  We’ve been certified organic since the very beginning.  Our farmers, including myself, have all been certified growers for more than 25 years.  And we’ve done so with few, if any, government subsidies.  As “they say” in politics it is a “win-win” for consumers.

July in Eastern Washington is awash in bright light, clear skies, and hot temperatures.  This is the weather that sets the finishing stages for so many different fruits and grains here.  With cereal grains finishing their growth and heading out and pollinating; hot July weather forces plants to reach for the sugars and bring nutrients up to the fruit, be it actual fruit like cherries, apricots, peaches, or grain kernels.  These sugars develop into protein.  These proteins and minerals add up to flavor! 

Our grain is in full pollination.  As I look out the farm office window and watch the tall einkorn sway in the wind like a river, I think of all the thousands of years this wild food has done what it still does today.  We feel most fortunate to work with this grain, and to be able to bring it to fruition by hulling it and screening it into plump kernels, and milling these kernels into aromatic whole grain flour for you.

As we near the 250 year mark of old glory – now just a year or two  away – I feel so indebted to our ancestors and their fight for our independence.  As broken as this country can feel at times, we still have amazing resources, ingenuity, and perseverance.  By and large, we are a food independent nation.  Of our many strengths this, perhaps, is our greatest.  We have enough land to sustain our population indefinitely, if we can just get back to more sustainable and diverse production practices.  Choose good food for the good of your health, and for the good our country!  

Cheers,

Farmer Sam

American Flag at Bluebird Grain Farms

May oh May… a more delightful May than this years’ I can’t imagine.  A few days in the 70’s and  80’s; a few valley rain showers and snow squalls in the mountains; wind and calm, then temps in the 30’s as we leave the month behind.  Quite the variety of weather, alright.  That is what makes Spring here so fun.  Lest I forget the birds!  Chats and buntings; swallows and wrens; orioles and tanagers…  Truth to tell, I could sit all day and watch and listen.

Alas, that would not be of much help to our wonderful crew here at Bluebird Grain Farms.  They’ve been working hard at keeping our systems running smoothly, and shipping out orders nationwide from our little valley.  Our supply of organic grain remains solid as we enter the last quarter before harvest, and we are having a good year entering the final month of the 2024’s front half.  Nothing makes me happier than to hear good things about our grains and flours from a whole host of different customers.  The real kudos go out to all of you who take an interest in food, how it is grown and where it comes from.  Thank you!

All of this year’s crops are planted and growing right along.  The northern prairies have received nice rains, our partners report.  The earlier planted crops here in the Columbia Basin at Brad’s Lenwood Farms are a foot tall now, and cover crops at our own farm are beginning to stretch up toward the gathering daylight.  Wow.  Can we be just 3 weeks from Summer Solstice!  Plants really kick into gear come this time of the year.  Let the sweet, rich juices of June flow.  

Yes, we could use more rain here.  In the past, the month of June often delivered.  The longer we get into the summer months without excessive heat, the longer we can hold off drought if the days are just cooler and cloudier.  Once crops reach a certain growth stage – grain knee high – then the plants themselves harbor moisture and protect the soils.  This is one reason we love the ancient wheats because they grow so tall, and create a shade effect that preserves moisture in their roots.  This function is not dissimilar to trees, albeit on a much smaller scale.  Soil preservation, high organic matter, nutritious food – these are just some of reasons to celebrate the wheats that once were.  

But we’ve brought them back!  We have been touting these qualities for nearly 20 years now and it is exciting to see continued  interest and rising popularity of these time-tested grains.  Their attributes and versatility both agronomically and culinarily continue to engage and teach us as years go by.  I’m guessing this does not change anytime soon.  To quote William Faulkner: “The past is never dead, it’s not even past.”

Our job hasn’t changed either, and that is seeing to it that all of you get these ancient grains freshly delivered on a consistent basis.  This is one way we can improve on our food systems that still remain flawed.  Currently, the FDA and USDA continue to try and sort out the recent Avian Flu mess that is a self-fulfilled prophecy, of sorts, as I mentioned last month.  Feeding our animals the wrong diet – turning herbivores into carnivores – is not sustainable.  Over 4 million laying hens alone have been destroyed and disposed of…  How?  Where?  Will the dairy herds be next?  Yuck.

In related news, remember the Farm Bill?  The last one expired in September of 2023.  I mentioned in last fall’s Notes how we would not see a new bill before the end of the year.  The question is now: Will we see one before the end of this year?  In a lot of ways this delay may be a good thing since it has morphed into a piece of broken and partisen farming legislation.   However, very crucial programs such as SNAP still hang in the balance.  Not so good.

We enjoyed a nice Memorial weekend granary tour here at the Farm.  It is always engaging for Brooke and myself to see new faces, meet new people, have new discussions and teach and learn all at once.  During the whole weekend I kept in mind what the past “holiday” really is about and that is to honor and memorialize those who made the ultimate sacrifice for this great nation of ours.  Yes, it is a great country.  Democracy is far, far from perfect and remains a constant work in progress.  However, I’ll still take it every day.

Here’s to health, decency and peace for the coming summer.

Yours,

Farmer Sam

Whole Day for Whole Grains

Bluebird Grain Farms joined in the Whole Grains Day event on March 27th, organized by the Whole Grains Council. This global celebration aims to encourage people to enjoy whole grains in various ways. We shared over 200 lbs. of our tasty whole grain samples with different businesses and institutions across the country. We were excited to share our Spelt, Emmer, and Einkorn with Washington State University.

Martha Flores, the health and wellness coordinator at WSU, shared her thoughts and experiences with us. She thanked us for supporting their “Grain Week” vision and mentioned how students enjoyed trying out different grains. They even played a game called “Guess the Grain” and were excited to take home samples to incorporate into their meals. Martha noted that students were particularly thrilled to learn that these grains were locally grown in Washington. We’re delighted to have been a part of such a positive and educational experience!

Salmon Safe Certification

Bluebird Grain Farms has just renewed our Salmon Safe Certification. This certification signifies our commitment to environmentally sustainable farming practices. Salmon Safe is a program that promotes habitat protection and restoration to ensure the health and vitality of Pacific Northwest watersheds. By adhering to Salmon Safe standards, we’re not only safeguarding water quality but also preserving vital habitats for salmon and other wildlife. This certification underscores our dedication to responsible agriculture and our role in protecting the delicate ecosystems that surround our farms. We’re proud to be part of the organizational work involved in promoting healthy habitats and sustainable farming practices.

It’s gifting season. Our gift boxes are the perfect holiday gift for anyone in the family: the foodie, the baker, the chef, the bread connoisseur, and don’t forget kids LOVE pancakes!  All gift boxes include a personalized handwritten note to the recipient!  Want to personalize your gift boxes? Make your own gift box on Saturday, Dec. 9th, 10am-2pm at our granary in Winthrop or order via our online store. We can ship it for you right from the store with $9.99 flat rate shipping! We don’t have a formal tour scheduled for the 9th, sign up for our next tour on the 30th, below.

Bluebird goods can also be found in all Methow Valley grocery stores, PCC Markets, New Seasons Markets, and many independent natural food stores in Washington State.

Next Granary Tour & Open House: Saturday, December 30th.

Visiting the valley: learn about how Ancient Grains are grown and processed.  The tour begins at 10 am and our retail store is open from 10-2. RSVP for the tour here or email larkin@bluebirdgrainfarms.com.

Upcoming Tours & Holiday Open House

Bring your friends and family to tour our granary and learn about how we grow and process our ancient wheats. We will have our store open and gift options available for purchase. Tours last approximately 1 hour and start promptly at 10 am. We welcome all ages! Sign up HERE for our granary tours.

  • Saturday November 25th- 10 am Tour and Open House
  • Saturday December 9th – 10 am-2pm Open House and Gift Building
  • Saturday December 30th- 10 am-2pm Tour and Open House

See us at Gobble UP Northwest- Seattle, November 18th

COME DISCOVER THE BEST CRAFT FOOD MAKERS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AT URBAN CRAFT UPRISING’S PREMIER NORTHWEST FOOD SHOW. Bluebird Grain Farms will be at Magnuson Park Hangar 30 selling our products for the holiday Please join us at this fun and festive food event from 10-5pm.

WHY COME TO GOBBLE UP?

  • It’s FREE to attend!
  • You’ll get to sample and enjoy delicious foods all day long
  • You’ll have dozens of chances to win FREE raffle prizes, donated by some of our favorite local restaurants and small businesses
  • You’ll discover new products and ingredients that you can use in your own home kitchen
  • You’ll find GREAT gifts for the holidays, for anyone who likes cooking or food (who doesn’t?!)
  • You’ll discover over 80 local crafty food and beverage vendors that you may have never heard of before…or who may be one of your favorite vendors that you can stock up with in person!

The Giving Season

We are happily selling our gift boxes for the holidays! Our new packaging sure looks nice in our gift boxes. Take advantage of our $9.99 shipping rate and send your items anywhere in the lower 48. Hand written gift card is included.

You will see our NEW packaging rolling out this week. All of our 2 lb., 4 lb. and 5 lb. packages will start showing up on the shelves with our beautiful bright new packaging and color schemes (which correlate with the variety of grains). Einkorn- Orange, Emmer- Yellow…. you get the point. We have also modified sizes: all flour and grain blends are now in 2lb. or 4 lb. ( no more 4.5 lb). All whole grains come in 5lb. and 25lb. sizes. And totes if you are really hungry!

Caleb and I had fun attending the UNFI Winter Show in Vegas last week where our whole grains were a ray of sunshine amidst a sea of protein bars, seaweed corn puffs, and instant meals. While it’s a bit perplexing to see how the natural food industry sometimes portrays health food, we’re super excited to be connecting with grocery buyers in the West. And kudos to those buyers who recognized the unique attributes of our vertically integrated brand AND those who purchased our product because it actually is a whole food. This dynamic is perhaps one of the most challenging aspects of navigating the natural food industry.

What drives sales in this industry? Snack food, argh! Don’t get me wrong I loved eating the crispy seaweed puffs but the health of our (national) food system is a growing issue. Literally. There is so much work to do to improve the health of soil, food and access to those who need it most. If you happen to be a grocery buyer and value true whole foods, don’t hesitate to give us a shout. AND if you are hankering for our products in your local grocery store PLEASE let the store buyer know. It takes a village to get real food to the people and I cannot emphasize enough how important it is that you advocate to your local food buyer.

Speaking of soil health! We are partnering with friends of Friends of Winthrop Library to bring David Montgomery and Anne Bikle to the Winthrop Barn on October 21st for a lecture and discussion about how to heal our land and reclaim our health. Please note, due to popular demand the location has moved from the Winthrop Library to the Winthrop Barn.

What Your Food Ate takes evidence from recent and forgotten science to illustrate how the health of the soil nourishes crops, livestock, and ultimately us.  Join us as we delve into the book and collectively share insights on the profound connection between soil health and human well-being.

Reserve your seats

 Zoom available for remote viewing. Email FOWL98862@gmail.com for access.

On October 22nd from 10:30 to Noon, Bluebird will host a informal walk and talk in the field with David and Anne at our farm in Winthrop. Please RSVP to brooke@bluebirdgrainfarms.com if you would like to attend the farm walk.

  • Stop in and see us in our new digs at 19611 Hwy 20 Winthrop. We are open to the public Monday through Friday from 9-4.
  • Coming Soon: New Website and Online Store. We will be upgrading to a new website and online shopping experience in October! We are really excited to bring you a better platform and store front. Stay tuned for a new look in October + we will have a stellar site for our Wholesalers to order from.
  • SAVE THE DATE: Bluebird Grain Farms is partnering with Friends of Winthrop Library to bring David Montgomery and Anne Bikle’ to the Winthrop Library on October 21st for a lecture and discussion about how to heal our land and reclaim our health. What Your Food Ate takes evidence from recent and forgotten science to illustrate how the health of the soil nourishes crops, livestock, and ultimately us.  Join us as we delve into the book and collectively share insights on the profound connection between soil health and human well-being. More information on the book can be found on the authors’ website: https://www.dig2grow.com/. If you are in our What Your Food Ate book group, we will be meeting this Thursday, September 7th at 4:30 in the Winthrop Library. Bring a dish to share.

What is Emmer Farro?

Emmer, known in Italian as Farro, is an ancient ancestor of modern wheat. It is a toothsome, chewy grain when cooked, with wonderful nutritional benefits and a delicious flavor profile.

Our emmer berries are intact whole grain, which means that they require some time for correct preparation. Keep reading for more information on soaking, cooking, serving, storing, milling, and more!

Cooking with Emmer Berries Pie

Emmer Cooking Times

If you’re familiar with farro from the grocery store, you may have tried using the same techniques for preparing our emmer farro. Most store-bought farro is “pearled” – an imported Farro with the germ and bran removed that results in a quicker cooking time, fewer nutrients and a softer texture.

Our whole grain Farro can seem “chewier” than standard farro, and it is, in fact, a plump chewy berry when properly cooked. Please note that while it makes an excellent substitute for rice in a risotto preparation, it will not have the texture of rice, but a pleasant ‘al dente’ resistance when fully cooked. It will need at least 60 minutes to achieve the right consistency.

Prefer a softer texture? We recommend soaking our grain overnight, then cooking it for 40-50 minutes and draining excess water. Having plenty of water is key for achieving the best texture. Even though it may take a while to cook our emmer farro, the benefit is that it does keep its chewy texture over time. You can cook a big batch on Monday and enjoy the same taste and texture throughout the week.

Yet another beautiful thing about this grain is that you can’t overcook it. It can be simmered for hours and remains a chewy berry, which is why we highly recommend it for soups and other preparations where you might be reheating it frequently.

Preparation Methods

We understand that not everyone has time to sit over a stove stirring their pot of emmer. Luckily, this grain adapts very well to preparation in a rice cooker, slow cooker, instant pot, and even pressure cooker.

We recommend using the brown rice setting on your rice cooker (if it comes with settings, that is!). Slow cooking also works great, but remember Emmer takes a long time to cook, so you’ll need 3-4 hours on a high heat setting in a slow cooker or crockpot to fully cook the grain. For pressure cooking, remember to use plenty of water – at least twice as much water as grain to ensure that the emmer doesn’t burn and fully cooks.

Cooking with Emmer Preparation Methods for Breakfast

What about cracked emmer?

We also sell an emmer product where the grain’s hull has been cracked (but not removed or pearled, so you still get the full nutritional value). Because it is cracked, the cooking time is reduced to 12-15 minutes. You can also soak it overnight to decrease that time even further for use in hot breakfast cereal.

Cracked emmer works as an excellent overnight oats substitute, if you soak it in milk overnight and then heat it up for a few minutes before eating. It is also a much healthier alternative for cream of wheat. Serve it up with shredded coconut, fresh or dried fruit, yogurt, nut butter, and other toppings for a tasty, filling breakfast.

Milling emmer berries

Let’s just get this question out of the way immediately: do not try to grind your Emmer berries in a coffee grinder!

All ancient and modern wheat berries are too hard for a coffee grinder to process and you will just end up ruining your machine and losing both the grain and your freshly brewed cup of coffee! If you need to grind small amounts of Emmer berries into flour at home, you can look into one of our small batch mills as a perfect solution. If that sounds like too much work, you can always order some of our emmer flour. We mill it in small batches to order, so you can always rely on having the freshest flour at your disposal.

Bulk-cooking and storing emmer berries

The good news is that our emmer freezes beautifully after cooking. If you’ve got a big bag of emmer berries and don’t know what to do with them, we always suggest doubling or tripling the recipe on the bag of our bag. After 60 minutes of cooking, drain the excess water, cool the cooked grain completely, and then freeze in bags or containers to be used at your convenience.

Baking and Cooking with Emmer Flour for Muffins

Baking with emmer flour

Our organic, fresh-milled emmer flour is excellent for baking! It features a sweet nutty flavor, especially used within a few weeks of milling. As an ancient form of wheat, Emmer behaves in a similar fashion to the durum whole wheat flours we are already familiar with. We mill our flour very fine so you can use it to make fabulous wide noodle pastas (a tradition in northern regions of Italy), dense breads, cookies, muffins, and crusts.

Organic Sonora Heritage Wheat Back in Stock

Harvest has started. Sonora heritage soft white wheat berries and flour are back in stock in both retail and wholesale channels. We are now offering Sonora heritage wheat in 2000 lb. totes to our wholesale customers. You can find our Sonora online or give us a call: 509-996-3526

Emmer Flour and Hard Red Wheat Flour lands on PCC shelves!

Look for our 2 lb. Emmer flour and 2 lb. Methow Hard Red Flour- it should be landing on the shelves in the next month. Our organic Whole Grain Emmer, and Hard White and Red Wheats should also be found in your bulk sections. Don’t see the products you would like to? Please let your local grocery store buyers know what Bluebird products you would like to see. Reach out to us also: we keep a list of customer requests.

New Packaging!

We have new packaging for all of our 2, 4, and 5 lb. products. You will see the new packaging in your orders starting in September. This has been a multiple year project that Brooke Lucy has been working on with her design and packaging team. We are delighted to offer a #4 recyclable package. All of our flour, cracked grains and handcrafted blends will transition to 2 and 4 lb. units. Our whole grains will remain in 5 lb. units.

New Podcast!

In episode 6 Deputy Don and Farmer Sam discuss how harvesting, storage, and the processing of ancient wheat profoundly impact the quality and flavor.  Join them as they uncover the nuances behind processing emmer wheat.  Click HERE to listen now.

Join us, October 21st.

Bluebird Grain Farms is partnering with friends of Friends of Winthrop Library to bring David Montgomery and Anne Bikle’ to the Winthrop Library on October 21st for a lecture and discussion about how to heal our land and reclaim our health.

What Your Food Ate takes evidence from recent and forgotten science to illustrate how the health of the soil nourishes crops, livestock, and ultimately us.  Join us as we delve into the book and collectively share insights on the profound connection between soil health and human well-being. More information on the book can be found on the authors’ website.

 

Bluebird Grain Farms is partnering with friends of Friends of Winthrop Library to bring David Montgomery and Anne Bikle’ to the Winthrop Library on October 21st for a lecture and discussion about how to heal our land and reclaim our health.

In the book, the authors David R. Montgomery and Anne Biklé take us beyond the well-worn adage to deliver a new truth: the roots of good health start on farms. What Your Food Ate takes evidence from recent and forgotten science to illustrate how the health of the soil nourishes crops, livestock, and ultimately us.  Join us as we delve into the book and collectively share insights on the profound connection between soil health and human well-being.

More information on the book can be found on the authors’ website: https://www.dig2grow.com/ 

If you are signed up for our Book Club Discussion, we will be meeting at the Winthrop Library on July 13th from 4:30 to 6:00 pm. We will be discussing chapters 1-6. Please sign up HERE if you plan to join our Book discussion group. Books can be checked out at the Winthrop Library or purchased at Trails End Bookstore.

As longtime Methow Valley residents, we at Bluebird Grain Farms have always been staunch supporters of land conservation efforts. In fact, our new granary and processing facility is located on a property that is permanently protected by a conservation easement!

We’re particularly excited about the Methow Conservancy’s latest conservation project. Imagine the Methow: the Campaign for Sunny M Ranch is on track to purchase and protect 1200 acres near the town of Winthrop, to preserve possibilities for wildlife habitat, farming, recreation, and the local economy. Many mountain communities never get a chance to determine what the landscape near town looks like and how it reflects what the community values. The Methow Valley does.

More than 1000 people & households have joined the Campaign for Sunny M Ranch so far. Once that number reaches 1200, a pool of six donors will give an additional $100,000 toward the campaign goal of $8.3M, bringing the campaign total raised to $8M.

Bluebird Grain Farms is a proud business sponsor of the Methow Conservancy and we are happy to be a part of the Campaign for Sunny M Ranch. We hope you’ll join us in being a part of 1200 donors for 1200 acres. Learn more HERE

A Few Visitors stopped in this Month

We have had lots of wonderful folks stopping in to Bluebird. Here’s a shout out to a few that we got to see this month. We appreciate you taking the time to stop in.

Bruce and Bob from the West Side.Bruce has been a long time customer at Bluebird. He stopped in to get his Pasayten Hard White Wheat Berries for his sourdough bread. He reports that he mills everything at home for his weekly bread baking routine. His buddy Bob, who has a cabin in the Methow, is not much of a baker but loves to eat Bruce’s Bread.

Bob: I hope the T-shirt fit!

Melissa Spear, the Executive director of Tilth Alliance, a state wide organization that advocates for organic agriculture and local food systems, stopped in with valley resident Gwynn. It was fun to show them our farm and to discuss the opportunities and challenges of Organic Agriculture in Washington State.

If you would like to learn more about Tilth Alliance, please visit their website and consider becoming a member.

Upcoming Granary & Farm Tours

Public Drop in Hours: Monday-Friday,9:00 to 4:00 PM

We welcome drop in visitors on site Monday-Friday from 9:00 am-4:00 pm. Stop in and see our new digs and pop up shop. If you would like to request a group tour ( 10 +) of our facility- please reach out to brooke@bluebirdgrainfarms.com and we will do our best to accommodate you. Our address is 19611 Hwy 20, Winthrop WA.

Pick up Box

We have a pick up box on our front porch. If you are only here on the weekend you can place your order online, choose “farm pickup” and you will not be charged for shipping. We will place your order in our pick up box for weekend and after hours pick up.

Be an Ambassador to Bluebird

Would you like to see Bluebird products in your local grocery store? We sell our ancient grain products in bulk and pre packaged to grocery stores throughout the PNW and beyond. If you are willing to do a little leg work for us, we’d love to help facilitate getting our products in your local store. Email us at info@bluebirdgrainfarms.com the name of your store, the contact information of your store grocery buyer- including email, and phone number. We ask that you speak directly to the buyer and ask them what the process is (every store is different and It is immensely helpful to have customers request our products with their local grocery buyers).

Upcoming Granary & Farm Tours

  • Saturday, May 13th Noon – 3 PM: Open house, baked goods and pop up shop from 12-3pm. Granary Tour is from 2:00-3:00 PM. Sign up HERE if you would like to participate in the tour.

Public Drop in Hours: Monday-Friday, 9:00 to 4:00

We welcome drop in visitors on site Monday- Friday from 9:00 am-4:00 pm. Stop in and see our new digs and pop up shop. If you would like to request a group tour ( 10 +) of our facility- please reach out to brooke@bluebirdgrainfarms.com and we will do our best to accommodate you. Our address is 19611 Hwy 20, Winthrop WA.

Pick up Box

We have a pick up box on our front porch. If you are only here on the weekend you can place your order online, choose “farm pickup” and you will not be charged for shipping. We will place your order in our pick up box for weekend and after hours pick up.

Be an Ambassador for Bluebird

Would you like to see Bluebird products in your local grocery store? We sell our ancient grain products in bulk and pre packaged to grocery stores throughout the PNW and beyond. If you are willing to do a little leg work for us, we’d love to help facilitate getting our products in your local store. Email us at info@bluebirdgrainfarms.com the name of your store, the contact information of your store grocery buyer- including email, and phone number. We ask that you speak directly to the buyer and ask them what the process is (every store is different and It is immensely helpful to have customers request our products with their local grocery buyers).